It’s Social Enterprise Week in Minnesota. So What?

If you haven’t heard of social enterprise, you’re not alone.

Interested in having custom honey at your wedding? You'll feel good when you buy it from the Beez Kneez.  Photo w/founder Kristy Allen

Interested in having custom honey at your wedding? You’ll feel good when you buy it from The Beez Kneez — a local social enterprise that advocates for bees. Photo: founder Kristy Allen

But last year, Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak proclaimed the week of May 19th to be Social Enterprise Week.  So did St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman — and Minnesota’s Governor Mark Dayton!

Why? It’s not business as usual — it’s about businesses that focus on social-purpose too.

So this week, please make a special point to buy from a local social enterprise.  

When you buy from Peace Coffee the profits fund international agriculture and trade policy. When you buy from The Wedge, Linden Hills, and Seward Co-Ops you know they do more than traditional grocery stores; they evaluate the ecological, economic and social impacts of their business and their communities.  When a business buys services from Momentum Enterprises, they can then hire people with challenging problems and give them paid on-the-job training.

These purchases strengthen and expand our economy in ways that buying from traditional businesses do not, creating a win-win for our community.  Social enterprise products and services do double duty (double and triple “bottom lines”).  And you’ll find social enterprises in practically every type of business: recycling, online retailing, job placement, and a whole lot more.  Many of them are household names, but there are plenty of start-ups in the past several years.

Buying from a social enterprise is an easy way to put more of your money to work doing good.  Let’s make Minnesota a social enterprise leader!!

WHERE TO BUY GUIDE: a sampling of local social enterprises

The Arc Value Village Profits from the Twin Cities best thrift store raised $2 million to support children and adults with disabilities.  They even have a concierge!

Beez Kneez Honey House*  Buy from this social enterprise that delivers honey by bike!  They are tireless advocates for bees and offer education classes, which are going on right now.

Birchwood Café*  This “good real food” restaurant goes the extra mile to advocate for healthy food systems, supports local farmers, pays living wage salaries — and is 100% wind powered. Having raised $100,000 through a Kickstarter campaign, they reopened just in time for Social Enterprise Week!

Eat For Equity  People meet for dinner and give what they can: the meeting place, the ingredients (local, organic, fair-trade), food-prep, and money. The proceeds are donated to nonprofits. Check out their local events or “Collaboration-Kitchen” training. Launched in Minnesota, it’s spreading across the country.

Full Cycle  Need to fix your bike — or buy a refurbished one? Your purchase supports young people experiencing homelessness with paid internships, street outreach, food shelf and more.

Latitude Prints  When you buy business cards, brochures, or banners online, 50% of the profits support empowering women and children living in extreme poverty.

Midtown Global Market  This cultural marketplace supports economic development in diverse communities. If you’ve never been there, you’re in for a real treat.

Now Boarding When you use their pet airport boarding, doggy day care and training facility, profits go to fund the Animal Humane Society’s mission.

 

Unfortunately there isn’t a master list of all social enterprises. Not yet!  So where can you go for more information?

Social Impact App lists a few local social enterprises (and many across the country).

Social Enterprise Alliance TC hosts events where you can meet social entrepreneurs.

Minnesota Business often features social enterprises (sometimes called social ventures).

I hope this inspires you to “start seeing social enterprises.”

At Mentor Planet, we specialize in mentor-matching social entrepreneurs and social innovators.  I’ll be posting interviews with social entrepreneurs, start-ups, innovation and more! 

 

 

Take the International Women’s Day Mentor Pledge

If you really want to help women have an equal voice in the world, mentor one. Be willing to become one woman’s biggest fan, her strongest advocate and active sponsor.  Invest your valuable knowledge to help her truly succeed.   So today, in honor of International Women’s Day, personally pledge to mentor at least one woman this year.

Are you willing to be a supportive catalyst, and mentor a woman this year?


Yes, women have made significant advances in the past 50 years, but there is so much more women could do.  Because at all levels of leadership – boardroom, school board, court house, state house – women remain underrepresented, and in some cases, absent altogether. Only when women are equally represented in all leadership roles with men, will our local communities and global economy maximize potential.

Why mentor a woman?  When you mentor a woman, you could vastly increase her potential to succeed.  Relationships make the difference.  Authentic mentoring goes much deeper than networking, trouble–shooting, or an occasional lunch.  It’s a relationship built on trust, which makes it possible to provide relevant insights.   Mentoring is more than merely access to someone’s contacts; it is person-to-person involvement  and investment in another person’s life.

A good mentor is a smart friend, one who is committed to helping a woman learn faster, take risks, and avoid mistakes — someone who is willing to share their experience, insights, and passion.  Just take what you already know and accelerate her growth. It’s that simple.

Whatever you’ve learned — from your success and failures or managing your career and personal life — someone out there can benefit from your know-how.  Be a catalyst for a woman to advance her career, take on a leadership role, run for office, or lead a better life.  Help her work through a business plan or career options, help navigate office politics, shore up technical skills, role model a balanced work/personal life, and much more.

Wondering who to mentor?  The opportunities are endless, so choose something you care about:

  • If you’re a change agent, mentor a change agent.
  • If you’re an entrepreneur, mentor a start up.
  • If you’re an intrapreneur, find another in your company.
  • If you’re an accountant, mentor an accountant.
  • If you’re a consultant, mentor a new freelancer.
  • If you’re in political office, mentor a woman who wants to enter politics.
  • If you’ve survived a merger, mentor someone who’s in the middle of one.
  • If you’ve changed careers, mentor someone who’s considering doing the same thing.

(Need more proof that women need mentors to make real progress? Check out the links below.)

And let’s totally bust the myth that “women don’t help women!”  I know I’ve been mentoring women since I started my career more than 30 years ago.  Some women help other women, some don’t.  (And some men support women, some don’t.) Whether you have a sister, daughter, wife/partner, cousin, co-worker, or friend, you’re likely to know a woman who could benefit from having a mentor.

Looking for a woman to mentor?  Find one at MentorPlanet.com.  You’ll also find tips to start your mentoring relationship.

Still need inspiration to take the “Mentor a Woman Pledge”?  Check out the leaders and activists from around the globe at the 3rd annual Women in the World Summit  — from Hillary Clinton to Angelina Jolie.  

So today, take the International Women’s Day Mentor Pledge to mentor a woman in 2012 — and become her biggest fan, her source of support and courage.   Imagine how different our world would be if everyone decided to mentor just one woman in 2012.  Working together, we can create a tipping point to build momentum for women’s voices and leadership to reach equal representation.  Be a mentor and support women who are on the move, making a difference around the world.

Links:

On average, a Minnesota woman is shortchanged $11,000 annually or $1 million over the course of her professional career; women with advanced degrees (doctors, lawyers), it’s twice as much (a $2 million loss). Poverty, homelessness, and a lack of affordable quality childcare remain problems that disproportionately affect Minnesota’s female-headed households, women of color, and older women.

McKinsey Research: Changing companies’ minds about women The percentage of women on boards and senior-executive teams remains stuck at around 15 percent in many countries, and just 3 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women. Women account for roughly 53 % of entry-level professional employees in the largest US industrial corporations, but only 37 % of middle-management positions, 28 percent of vice-president and senior-managerial roles, and 14 percent of seats on executive committees.  And nearly four times as many men as women at large companies make the jump from the executive committee to CEO.

The World Needs Female Entrepreneurs Now More Than Ever